My Theory of How to Approach Writing

When discussing theory, there are many possible definitions, maybe so many there will never really be one set way to define it, kind of like genre. The definition that I was given is, “a theory is a system of ideas intended to explain things”. When theory pertains to writing however, the “system of ideas” can become quite large and complex. There are a ton of different qualifications that must be met before something can be considered a good piece of writing. I like to use the term “appropriate” writing because I believe that what is suited for one piece of writing is not always appropriate for another. Writing is contextual and cumulative, it has to paint a picture of the situation for which a piece is being written. In that picture there must be pictures, kind of like a slide show or flipbook. One person’s writing builds off of everything previous they have written and conceptualized in the past. Purpose and context are the two things I find most important when defining a great piece of writing.

The first idea of my theory of writing is always understand your purpose. Before you begin to write you have to know why you are writing and everything you hope to accomplish in that piece of writing. Of course these things should never limit you, often times in a good piece of writing these expectations will be far exceeded. Whether the writing is for academic, personal, promotional, conceptual, subliminal, general or whatever purpose it may be, you have to understand that before approaching the writing situation. It is important to have a driving force behind what you are writing and make sure that it shines through for your readers. Even if what you are writing is to yourself, when you write something one day for a specific purpose, you want to be able to return to it and have sight of what was intended to be perceived when you originally wrote it. The picture in your head should be maintained from the time the piece is written to the time you revisit that piece. The purpose of your writing is also more than just your choice of words, it’s the arrangement, placement, punctuation, it’s everything. When you take hold of the purpose behind your writing, the way you write will more accurately reflect the message you are trying to present. Your purpose doesn’t have to be something that blows minds or changes people’s perspectives; it may be something as simple as a quick reminder email to someone. Even in situations where you may think that stopping to evaluate your purpose for what you are writing is unimportant, taking the time to do so will always yield a better end result of your writing and a better understanding of it by the readers or recipients.

The next important aspect of my theory of writing is context, which goes right in line with purpose. In terms of writing, the definition of context by Google is, “the parts of something written or spoken that immediately precede and follow a word or passage and clarify its meaning.” Context is all about interpretation, situation and perspective. While writing, one must chose the context or contexts they want their readers to understand while evaluating their piece. Context must be established, especially when discussing something that could have many differing interpretations. Blanket statements and open-ended questions can sometimes add dramatic affect to one’s work, but only result in confusion if the appropriate context is not established. Many times a good writer will try and strike up controversy and questioning by making such statements, but this is usually done to reiterate and help readers further understand their purpose. That purpose however, will be unable to be recognized without proper context being explained. Context is also important to you as a writer before beginning your piece. You have to narrow your research or focus to maintain the bigger picture of your writing. If you are writing a research paper than you will probably spend more of your time filling in content with facts and research than focusing on the word choice or beauty of the piece. However, if you are writing a novel or short story, or even a love letter, the context of your writing should reflect more of passion and visual in addition to the elegance of the flow you have with your choice of words throughout your piece. Context is interpretation, especially as a reader. If your purpose and context were clear throughout your writing, then your readers will interpret the piece the way you intended.

The last thing I’ll say about approaching any given writing situation is know how to articulate your words in a way that is both detailed and concise. No one wants to read something that is all words and no understanding. Sometimes less is more but always know how to articulate your message in your writing through use of vocabulary, terminology, extended or prior knowledge, references, punctuation, but above all focus. Keep in mind your purpose and context(s) throughout your writing and you will be able to beautifully articulate the words that paint the picture of your piece.

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My Final Reflection Letter

Dear Professor Cook and UWRT 1103 Peers,

I am writing this letter to you as a conclusion to completing the UWRT 1103 course this semester. As I enter in to unraveling how I have developed as a writer, I will share with you some past moments that have impacted my journey. When I look back on these moments now, I can see how I have grown as a writer and that my views have further developed and expanded on the given subjects. My development, like writing is progressive and contextual. I have realized and acknowledged more about writing in this past semester than I have in my entire life with my writing experiences.

The first moment this semester that had significant meaning to it, was when we as a class evaluated literacy. We talked about what it means to be literate, what literacies in writing are, and how the terminology and definition may be evolving to suit our given place in time. Almost everyone in our county these days is by definition “literate”, so how might we expand upon that definition now to reflect today’s society? Well, originally when I asked myself this question in class I decided that my understanding of being literate meant, “to be able to read and write well and with proper technique”. After reflecting back on this moment I still agree with this more in depth definition, but I also want to expand upon it. After analyzing all that it means to be literate and applying it to my experience throughout this course, I realize that being literate is more understanding what good writing is and how to be a good writer, rather than something as narrowed as following technique or format. I consider myself to be more literate now than I ever have been; I believe literacy is progressive. To apply this concept to my life and writing, I would say that understanding what it means to be literate, is growing and developing my writing in such a way that I will always strive to be more literate. Now that I have this new understanding of literacy I can apply it to my writing and work towards a goal of mastering literacy. I now perceive literacy as something personal to each writer and each writer has their own level of literacy of which they hope to achieve.

The next moment that really made an impact on my development as a writer was when context became a topic of in-depth discussion. Before talking about context and what it meant in terms of writing, I never really thought twice about it. I always viewed context as something that pertained to vocabulary being interpreted in a sentence. I never saw the bigger picture that context aids in developing. When I think back to when context was first explained in class and in terms of literacy, the understanding I formed was “literacies are contextual, and context is interpretation”. I remember thinking to myself that context really just meant the situation or position of what was being written and how the readers perceive it. I have come so far since that first initial understanding and have really embraced the meaning of that statement. My biggest new understanding of context is that, it is something that should be mutual between the reader and the writer. The context of which something is being written should ultimately be the same for which it is being read. Or maybe the reason someone is reading the piece isn’t the same reason for why it was written, it may just be a requirement, but that’s where the word interpretation plays a major role. The writer’s context should always be the reader’s interpretation. If something was written with intended purpose, the context should be the framework by which that purpose is articulated and interpreted. After analyzing context and forming this new understanding I have applied it to my writing and will continue to take it into account every time I write. Context is so important and is the difference between just reading, and really understanding a piece of writing. I will continue to work on improving my use and presentation of context in every piece of writing I develop.

The last moment significant to my development as a writer this semester, was when we talked about genre. For so long I had always thought about genre as a title or category for a specific type of writing, movie, or song. It wasn’t until our group discussion one day in class, that I was enlightened on the real meaning and context of genre in writing. There are a lot of different ways genre can be looked at in writing. Most people think of genre as a “type”. Well they aren’t completely wrong because genre can be a type, but instead of it being looked at as solely descriptive, it can also be viewed as its own thing or way of doing something. A genre is its own unlimited descriptor of other things. When I came to this understanding, in that moment, I remember thinking to myself, “but how is genre a thing?” It wasn’t really until completing my group facilitation project, doing research, and making connections of my own, that I fully grasped this concept of genre. Even now I still believe that genre can be viewed in a couple of different ways, there really is no set definition. If there was one thing I learned about genre after analyzing this moment and forming this new understanding, it’s that genre is very commonly misunderstood and overlooked. Often times we don’t consider the genre for which we are writing or forming, we just write and then try to match our writing to a given genre or category. What I have come to realize is that genre is actually its own production. It develops and evolves throughout ones writing and can sometimes work to contradict itself. What I’ve come to realize is most important when analyzing genre, is simply to remember it is not a type of category that shapes writing; but rather it presents a new form of which to classify writing and all of its attributes. Genre works to present both understanding and question. After developing this new understanding of genre I have realized that our typical misconstrued definition of genre actually limits our writing; and if we have this set “genre” in mind to which we are trying to fit our writing into, we are only restricting the potential of our work. Now that I have come to understand genre in this new and unlimited way, I can apply it to my writing by working to create and form new uses for genre, and challenge myself and my readers, through uses of this commonly overlooked concept. Genre will always be an influential aspect of writing and should never be overlooked or misinterpreted as this common definition of it being a category. My goal as a writer is to keep investigating all aspects of genre, and try to further understand its importance and usefulness in my writing.

Overall this course has taught me a lot about myself as a writer and bettered my understanding of what it takes to be a good writer. After reflecting back on these very pivotal moments throughout the semester it is my understanding that writing has no limits, only guidelines to help making a piece of writing easier to understand and interpret the way it was intended to be. Things like literacy, context, and genre are only but a few of the important components that make up great writing. It is my goal to continue to develop my writing skills through better understanding of these concepts.

Inquiry Contribution Development

Evaluate our own discourse community, think about target audience, generate contribution and platform. Contribution will be set and expressed through platform. Opening will point to contribution and determine the context and key point, then expand and give detail to what research has been done and facts that have been found and already been done and also what we are adding. Add pictures, videos, articles, blog, personal opinions and comments, etc. Determine audience formal or informal? Tone, context, specifics, and mood of text suited to audience. Make sure to include additional required elements of format for platform (ex. index, page numbers, colors, size of text, MULTIMEDIA!, illustrations, music, symbols, keys, web addresses, sources, etc.). Add personal media, perspectives and input. Put this in general authority, not just specific to the class.

Breadcrumbs for Money Linked to Society

-Call for submission journal money

Journals – Association for Psychological Science

Time-as-Money Mindset Decreases Green Behaviors

Pacific Standard:

How can people be convinced to think about the environmental consequences of their behaviors? New research suggests one surprising piece of the answer may be: Pay them a salary, rather than an hourly wage.

 

In five studies, described in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, they consistently found that “thinking about the economic value of time decreases environmental behavior.”

-Call for submission journal saving money

Wind energy is saving taxpayers money in Minnesota – The …

Nearly every time the wind blows in Mower County, Minnesota property taxes drop.

Most of that tax goes to the county, which uses it to offset property taxes. By law, the turbines themselves aren’t taxed, just the electricity they produce, County Coordinator Craig Oscarson said.

-Call for submission journal world without currency

World Economics Journal

The Global Financial and Economic Crisis, and the Creation of the Financial Stability Board

The 2007-2008 global financial and economic crisis precipitated a significant shift in the financial regulatory worldview (or paradigm) of political and central bank leaders from leading advanced and emerging states. With a common consensus on the required financial reforms, these actors moved swiftly to create a new organization. The Financial Stability Board (FSB) now stands at the centre of the global regulatory architecture, but it remains obscure, opaque, and closed to most external observers. The FSB needs to change as it matures to reflect its key role in global financial reform efforts.

 

What Were the Causes of the Great Recession?

Two ways of thinking about the causation of the Great Recession are contrasted: the ‘mainstream approach’ and the ‘monetary interpretation’. According to the mainstream approach, the Great Recession was due to the potential insolvency of the banking system and the correct antidote was tighter regulation. The paper proposes an alternative ‘monetary interpretation’, arguing that the macroeconomic trajectory of the major G7 economies in the Great Recession is readily understood by means of the monetary theory of the determination of national income. The main cause of the Great Recession is seen as a collapse in the annual growth rate of broad money from double-digit annual rates in the years before mid-2008 to virtually zero in the following three years. Further, the dominant reason for the money growth collapse was the abrupt and comprehensive tightening of bank regulation in late 2008. In particular, the raising of regulatory capital/asset ratios was a shock that intensified the downturn.

The Link Between Money and Nominal Spending

The recent financial crisis has reignited interest in the role of money and credit in driving economic activity. This article takes a broad overview of the historical data available for assessing the link between money, credit and activity, using the quantity theory of money as an organising framework. The article shows that when trying to apply this theory to historical data, a complicated interaction between money and nominal spending emerges. And a deeper understanding of the forces driving money demand and supply is required to interpret the information contained in money about the level of activity and inflation.

When Money Matters

The severe financial crisis that grips Spain has multiple causes. One has been the massive and continued expansion of the money supply since Spain’s accession to the Eurozone, and the non-negligible effects of this expansion on asset prices as well as on the structure of the economy. We analyse the main hypotheses underlying the mainstream macroeconomic models used in recent years to explain inflation and its relation to money. We then apply an ‘unobserved component model’ to test for the cyclical relation between money growth, inflation, asset (stock and real estate) prices and real GDP in Spain from 1998 to 2013. Based on the Spanish experience, our main finding is that, even though the money supply has become endogenous within the monetary strategy developed by the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank in recent times, the broad money supply and asset prices have shared the same cyclical component in the latest business cycle (1998–2013).

Money is Energy, and Empathy is the Currency for Changing

It comes down to real and direct interactions with other human beings. People are not corporate entities, they have feelings. They need to connect. The connection brings openness, availability and understanding. “For me,” says Jerry, “a breakthrough thought is that money is just a form of energy. Empathy is just a form of energy.” And furthermore, he says, “we can have this dialogue about how if everything we do is a means of reinforcement for our interdependence and interconnectedness as beings, then hot damn! We don’t have to be so alone!”

Call for Papers | 49th Parallel Journal

“Let me tell you something. There’s no nobility in poverty. I’ve been a poor man, and I’ve been a rich man. And I choose rich every time” – Leonardo DeCaprio as Jordan Belfort, The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

-Call for submission journal social behavior money

Journal of Business Ethics – ResearchGate

We develop an intricate theory with provocative implications: Procedural justice produces obedience. For “individualists”, interactional justice inspires loyalty and, interestingly, distributive justice “can only buy” participation, but “can’t buy” loyalty. Therefore, for individualists, interactional justice outweighs distributive justice for organizational loyalty. Based on Kyrgyz citizens’ justice, OCB, and individualism, our theory reveals novel insights regarding culture, money attitude, and intrinsic motivation and provides critical and practical implications to the field of business ethics.

Online Library Wiley

Does a money-is-all attitude cause alienation? A cross-cultural comparison of Korea, the US and Sweden

  • Money-is-all attitude;
  • alienation;
  • cross-cultural comparison;
  • Korea;
  • US;
  • Sweden

Money is increasingly being attributed more value in society, although a money-is-all attitude decreases social relationships and increases alienation in modern, industrialized societies. This research investigated the influence of this money-is-all attitude on alienation based on a cross-cultural comparison of Korea, the US and Sweden. The money-is-all attitude was defined as a perspective in which money is regarded as an indicator of achievement or success.

Self-administered online surveys were conducted with consumers ranging between the ages of 20 to 49 in Korea, the US and Sweden. The money-is-all attitude and alienation seemed to be more pervasive in Korea than in the US or Sweden. The money-is-all attitude was the factor with the strongest influence on alienation when controlling for socio-demographic factors. Furthermore, participation in sports activities was an important factor in decreasing alienation levels. The findings of this research imply that materialistic ways of thinking increase alienation and that money cannot contribute to human happiness and well-being. In addition, active participation in social activities can decrease alienation.

The research results suggest that a materialistic, money-is-all attitude negatively influences alienation across cultures; in addition, in the US, an affluent consumption-based country, the money-is-all attitude had more explanatory power for alienation than in Sweden and Korea. A change in values to overcome the money-is-all attitude is required and the concepts of sufficiency and mindfulness are suggested as alternative life perspectives for the pursuit of well-being.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijcs.12137/full

Emerald | International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior …

Surname, Initials (year), “Article title”, Newspaper, date, pages.

e.g. Smith, A. (2008), “Money for old rope”, Daily News, 21 January, pp. 1, 3-4. – See more at: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=ijebr#sthash.f4sqL0jc.dpuf

Journals Elsevier Search

http://www.elsevier.com/s/search.html?profile=_default&form=sitesearch&collection=elsevier-meta&query=economic+behavior+and+organization+articles

My Midterm Reflection

There is a time in every person’s life where they experience an epiphany. For me, one of the biggest epiphanies I ever experienced pertains to writing. At the beginning of this school year, coming to UNCC straight out of high school, my only writing experiences had been those restricted by the confines of a standard curriculum and format of writing. These restrictions even flowed over into my first semester in college and I was asked to write “five-paragraph essays”. It wasn’t until this semester and being enrolled in UWRT 1103 with Professor Cook that my writing became much more than that. It’s not all just format, length and criteria, but it’s context, purpose, and interpretation that make a great piece of writing.

This semester, I am taking four courses plus a lab. In one of these courses, an LBST course, I was asked to write a five-paragraph essay. This was about three and a half weeks into the semester and I had just become so “enlightened” by the fact that the five paragraph essay and thesis statements and all that were really just wrong to require. I remember my LBST professor saying “Okay so for this assignment you will be writing a simple five paragraph essay for your research on the Health Care System.” As soon as she said it I remember I got all hot and frustrated and I went from super distracted to all of the sudden being to tuned in but out of shock and disagreement. I felt like a spoiled kid whose parents had just flipped a switch and decided not to allow them to have such luxuries any more. Instantly, my hand shot up in the air and I was ready to protest or suggest instead of such a standard format, if we could just have content requirements instead of format requirements. But then I remembered what we had talked about in UWRT earlier that week. We discussed that as much as we would like writing to be about what we it to be, and include lots of personality in our writing and what not, sometimes the contextual part of writing includes a very narrow and fact based criteria. One form of writing that is appropriate for one assignment may not be as appropriate for another. “Good writing” I believe should really be looked at more as “appropriate writing”.

Since further developing as a writer and student in UWRT 1103, I have reevaluated that moment over and over in my head. It still frustrates me and that assignment itself still frustrates me. When it comes down to it, I really don’t enjoy standardized writing anymore. While in high school I considered myself to be a “good writer” I had mastered the five-paragraph essay. But now, I realize just how limited I was and that since learning what I know now about writing, I have been able to place myself in a specific writing community. I would consider my new style of writing to be highly expressive and well articulated, something I was never able to say before. Also I have been able to enjoy the writing process. There are so many aspects of writing that I can see now that I was never able to see before. Such as context, contrast, narrative vs. reflection, analytical vs. expressive, and what it truly means to be a good writer. All of these things influence my current standpoint on writing and I have fully learned to appreciate writing in a whole new light.

If there is one thing I can take away from this experience with writing, its what it takes to make create a good piece of writing. As long as an individual has correct grammar and spelling, articulates the information necessary in the assignment thoroughly, and meets the length requirements of the assignment, there shouldn’t be many other restrictions. Even though there are times when simple facts or analytical collections need to be expressed, one can do so in their own unique way of writing reflective of them that still captures the reader’s attention. Writing should be a form of personality, like art. Individuality should always be able to shine through in a persons writing regardless of the topic. As far as things like the five-paragraph essay go, as “good writers” we know there would probably be a better way to write about something than through that. However, another important part of being a good writer is being able to adapt and articulate certain tasks in writing even when we don’t want to, in order to accomplish a given task. I believe that writing should never be something we look at as a chore. Rather, it should be a creative outlet no matter what the purpose. Writing is limitless and should never be taken for granted. After reflecting upon everything I’ve learned thus far in the class and throughout the course of the semester, I cant say I have truly grown as a writer and know that I will continue to grow as the semester progresses.

Midterm Reflection Assignment

For our midterm reflection assignment, we are being asked to reflect upon certain moments in our life in our past that now with the knowledge and experience we have throughout this writing course we see through a different light. We are still all a little confused about what this exactly pertains to. How do we know which moments are appropriate? Is this about context of writing? I feel like one appropriate situation or moment I could use for example in my development of writing is when after three weeks into the semester and learning that it is okay to stray away from the five paragraph essay, then in my LBST class I was asked to write a five paragraph essay and it was like I was about to explode. This experience will have to be connected to all of my experience in writing and no blanket statements. We must hit all aspects of reflection and not necessarily in a specific order but the reflection can’t become a narrative.

My Groups Progress Through Inquiry

Throughout working on this inquiry project, both of my group members and I have been exploring different avenues of this topic. Each of us were assigned specific questions that we were to try and answer about our topic, through our individual research. During this process we have all been realizing just how difficult it is to find sources and concrete research on this topic. Given the fact that our main question is “what would the world be like without money?” is a hypothetical question, research on this topic is limited. Even with these constraints, I believe my group and I are doing a great job so far evaluating the possibilities and picking apart this topic.

Ellana’s job in in this inquiry process is evaluating the questions: Psychology between owing someone something, why as humans do we need to be paid back? And was there a turning a point for money to come into existence? One thing I’ve noticed since reading Ellana’s posts is that she has a great line of clear thinking that goes into her writing, you can really she the definitive avenues she choses to go down throughout her research and writing. There is a great amount of detail she presents and lots of intriguing questions she asks to further her writing process. So far, I think she is doing a great job with her part of this inquiry project. One suggestion I might have for her is to explore different areas of thinking, try and piece things that seem unrelated to the topic into new directions of her writing.

https://evallad2.wordpress.com/category/inquiry/

Larissa’s job in this inquiry process is evaluating the questions: How did currency develop in cultures? And how did bartering turn into currency? One thing I’ve noticed since reading Larissa’s posts was how great her research is and how much she is able to relate things from her sources into answering her specified inquiry questions. However, I am beginning to realize a narrowing of the topic instead of a broadening. I realize this is because she has the challenging job of taking fact based material and trying to turn it into something more abstract or create a new line of thinking while still remaining on topic and within the confines of her specified questions. She has given great detail so far in her writing and I feel like if she could continue this same way of writing while branching out a little more, she could accomplish a lot through her writing on this topic. One word of advice I would give to her would be to not to be scared to go completely out of range in her research from what she has been typically sticking to At this point our questions will be changing no matter how hard we try and that’s okay. It will allow for more opportunities and knowledge on exploring different angles of this theoretical society and its true potential.

https://llynch9.wordpress.com/2015/02/16/a-different-view-on-money-in-history/

My Life and Discourse Communities

How Discourse Communities Relate to My Life
In reading Swales’ The Concept of Discourse Communities, I have learned about the differences between a language community and a discourse community and just how easily I can relate what a discourse community is to my life. Swales talk about six specific factors that define a discourse community and that lead the way for the terms and conditions of such a group. It terms of my life at the University here at Charlotte, there are two of these communities I feel I fit into.

The first community I feel I fit into would be the pre-medical department. Whether or not everyone who is a part of this community is actually a “pre-med” major is irrelevant. There are many majors who fall into this community, such as: pre-kinesiology, pre-medical, pre-nursing, exercise science, physical training. All of these majors can relate on many different levels making them their own discourse community. Some of the six characteristics that Swales addresses that I can relate to this specific community are that we all have similar course studies. Most students in this community are required to take most, if not all of the same “major” courses. Another thing is the clubs that most of us participate in that prepare us for our particular major. In addition to these things, most of us are sent mass e-mails about up coming events for opportunities to get more involved in various medical programs. In a sense, we all kind of have our own lexis, or specific level of communication when we talk about the things we learn in our intensive chemistry, biology, math, or major related classes, that other people such as art, or music majors don’t understand. Another way that this particular community could be categorized as a discourse community is buy its common public goals. In being part of this community we all have the common goals of wanting to help others, get involved in the medical field, become health and wellness educated, and work in an intense but thrilling field. The writing style of this community is very analytical, educational, precise, and well articulated. A lot of the time because of the lack of writing in comparison to calculations in this field, most of the writing is fact based or procedure based.

The other community I feel that I fall into would be the music discourse community. This fits into the six characteristics of Swales discourse communities because of its common goals of wanting to explore music and expose more people to it through performance, compose new ideas for ways to expand the musical influence in our society and university, along with pushing ourselves to become better musicians and vocalists. This community definitely has its own lexis, and or way of communicating. It terms of music, there are various terms and acts that people who have not been exposed to music or music theory, would not be able to comprehend. Many times, I have found myself talking to someone about my chorus experience and describing to them what qualities one must poses to be considered good musicians or vocalists, and the person will be staring at my blankly because of their inability to understand my particular terminology. Within the community itself, we are free to use our lexis to quickly and effectively communicate our demands or critiques using terms specific to our performance or skills. Also within this community there are specific experts of professionals of the community. A choir director or conductor would be considered a novice member of the community. When talking about the writing style of this community it is music based or evaluation based which definitely requires skills such as recognizing context and proper review techniques. Many times there are people in this field who are required to leave extensive reviews for people looking to advance in this community and good literacy and writing skills are a must if that is something you are required to do.

When evaluating these two particular communities, it is clear to me and most likely to anyone else, that the writing styles and requirements of these communities are extremely different. They each have their own specific lexis, various differing common goals, and many different inner genres that divide and categorize the groups within the communities. Overall, I believe that both of these communities fit very well into the specifications of Swales’ discourse communities. I enjoy both of these communities equally and am proud to be involved in such different types of groups which both have a heavy positive influence on our society as a whole.

“Good Parenting” and it’s Importance

“Treat a child as though he already is the person he’s capable of becoming”(Haim Ginott). This quote is one that truly describes an act of good parenting. It shows that there should be a level of respect not just from the child to the parent, but to the child from the parent. The topic of “good parenting” or parental roles in our society, is a very complex subject. My interest in this topic sparks from my personal, and unique, relationship with my parents. My mom especially has had a strong influence of my feelings for this topic. I currently have a wonderful relationship with her, but if someone were to ask me four to five years ago, I would have described it as one of the worst.

My argument for this topic would be the importance of what I describe as “contextual parenting” or parenting based on the child as an individual. Just because one technique works for one kid, doesn’t mean it’ll work for the other. One controversial thing with parenting is being overbearing versus being trusting, or lenient. I have experience with this specific topic because I have personally witnessed and been subject to both bad and good parenting in my life, and in the lives of the people I’m close with.

This topic is becoming increasingly important in the context of our evolving society. Parents are constantly in question of what they should or should not allow their kids to do because of the extreme social, and technological advances in the past decade or so. The number one question at hand is typically, is there one universal guideline on how to be a good parent? Good parenting is not just important to parents and children, it goes beyond that. This should be important to teachers, employers, people of authority, people in government, politics… etc. The overall point to be made here, is that the way one parents, is extremely important to your children’s development and character, future, and relationship with their parents and others in their lives. Just a few of the things at stake are ongoing vicious cycles of bad relationships between parents and children, lack of respect for authority, too much control from parents, out of control children, reckless behavior, future resentment from children to their parents, and developmental or social restraints due to poor parenting. This is an issue that will always be a topic of interest and discussion by people and parents everywhere. I believe that in talking about it to people my age, that there will be positive insight gained by all how are involved. The more informed and aware of this topic people my age are, the more hope there is for the parenting of future generations.

Understanding of Schooled Literacy and Gatekeepers

At the start of this blog prompt, we were given a definition of a gatekeeper. A gatekeeper is defined as something or someone “used to signify either a person or force that creates protocols for entry into physical or abstract space.” To me, I was a bit confused by this definition especially because I have never heard this term used in context of writing. I have come to find that often in this course we are relating terms not typically thought to be related to writing, to our writing and inquiry pieces. After Addressing the chapter of The Elements of Literacy and evaluating the different perspectives on literacy and how it is used in context of education and schooling, It is clear that literacy can mean many more things than most people may think. When left open to interpretation and context, there really is no exact definition. This is something that can be used to address the five paragraph essay. After reading he Five-Paragraph Essay and the Deficit Model of Education by Lil Brannon, I felt enlightened that there has actually been something of renowned and legitimate writing that supports the negative impact of writing curriculum based off of the five paragraph essay. In this she talks about how this style of writing is hardly a style at all and hurts more than helps anyone who is originally taught this way. One main reason for this is because is real life no one actually writes this way or is able to properly articulate a good piece of writing while being limited to this format. Due to the fact that this is unnecessary and incorrect, we as our own gatekeepers must take matters into our own hands my gate keeping our minds from this wrong information.

It is important to keep in mind that we have the ultimate control over ourselves even if we are forced to write in this manner. We must allow ourselves to fulfill this task because of its appropriateness in context of requirement for our class but then we must do away with the understanding that this is the “proper” way to write. Another article, Teaching as Un-teaching backs this opinion of the five paragraph essay and also addresses the important point that students are literally having to work harder and undo what has been done in their minds and understandings of writing because of misgiven information about how they should write. They are being taught one set way to write and like said in the article Teaching as Un-teaching, this will not always be the type of writing needed in the future.Schooled literacy overlooks the fact that writing is limitless, or at least it should be. Limits may need to be put in place in context of providing a specific or more narrowed point in your piece of writing. However, though there are limits, what the limits are will most likely be different for every bit of writing you do throughout your life, and that is what the five paragraph essay lacks to inform.

Two more articles that can be addressed in this new understanding of literacy and gatekeepers are Deficit Model of Education, and Blaze’s Experience. After reading through both of these articles, I found many other supporting point of the negativity impact of the five paragraph essay and how it relates to the struggle of teaching as un-teaching. To bring all of what I have come to learn through these reading and my personal experience in this class I have come to raise the question, how can we become better gatekeepers of our own minds, and how do we become as literate as we can when the schooled literacy we are being taught from such a young age could actually be considered illiterate? This is something I hope is addressed and further looked into in hopes to change the government regulated state-wide writing curriculums.